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dc.contributor.authorPeddinti, Divyaswetha
dc.contributor.authorMemili, Erdogan
dc.contributor.authorBurgess, Shane C.
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-09T19:50:46Z
dc.date.available2015-10-09T19:50:46Z
dc.date.issued6/21/2010
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11668/2493
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0011240
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Oocytes are the female gametes which establish the program of life after fertilization. Interactions between oocyte and the surrounding cumulus cells at germinal vesicle (GV) stage are considered essential for proper maturation or 'programming' of oocytes, which is crucial for normal fertilization and embryonic development. However, despite its importance, little is known about the molecular events and pathways involved in this bidirectional communication. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used differential detergent fractionation multidimensional protein identification technology (DDF-Mud PIT) on bovine GV oocyte and cumulus cells and identified 811 and 1247 proteins in GV oocyte and cumulus cells, respectively; 371 proteins were significantly differentially expressed between each cell type. Systems biology modeling, which included Gene Ontology (GO) and canonical genetic pathway analysis, showed that cumulus cells have higher expression of proteins involved in cell communication, generation of precursor metabolites and energy, as well as transport than GV oocytes. Our data also suggests a hypothesis that oocytes may depend on the presence of cumulus cells to generate specific cellular signals to coordinate their growth and maturation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Systems biology modeling of bovine oocytes and cumulus cells in the context of GO and protein interaction networks identified the signaling pathways associated with the proteins involved in cell-to-cell signaling biological process that may have implications in oocyte competence and maturation. This first comprehensive systems biology modeling of bovine oocytes and cumulus cell proteomes not only provides a foundation for signaling and cell physiology at the GV stage of oocyte development, but are also valuable for comparative studies of other stages of oocyte development at the molecular level.
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPLoS ONE (Volume 5, Issue 6)
dc.subject.otherAnimals
dc.subject.otherBiological
dc.subject.otherCattle
dc.subject.otherCell Communication
dc.subject.otherCell Nucleus
dc.subject.otherCell Nucleus: metabolism
dc.subject.otherCumulus Cells
dc.subject.otherCumulus Cells: cytology
dc.subject.otherCumulus Cells: metabolism
dc.subject.otherFemale
dc.subject.otherGene Regulatory Networks
dc.subject.otherModels
dc.subject.otherOocytes
dc.subject.otherOocytes: cytology
dc.subject.otherOocytes: metabolism
dc.subject.otherProteome
dc.subject.otherProteome: metabolism
dc.subject.otherProteomics
dc.subject.otherProteomics: methods
dc.subject.otherSignal Transduction
dc.subject.otherSystems Biology
dc.subject.otherSystems Biology: methods
dc.titleProteomics-based systems biology modeling of bovine germinal vesicle stage oocyte and cumulus cell interaction.
dc.typeArticle
dc.publisher.departmentDepartment of Basic Sciences
dc.publisher.departmentDepartment of Animal and Dairy Sciences
dc.publisher.collegeCollege of Veterinary Medicine
dc.publisher.collegeCollege of Agriculture and Life Sciences
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0011240
dc.publisher.researchcenterInstitute for Digital Biology


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