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dc.contributor.advisorShaffer, Donald M.
dc.contributor.authorHayden, Antoinette Daineyell
dc.date2016
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-15T16:40:17Z
dc.date.available2020-09-15T16:40:17Z
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11668/20071
dc.description.abstractOctavia Butler’s Kindred is often looked at as a historical science fiction novel. While there are critics who have discussed the slave narrative aspects of the novel, the way Butler tackles authorship and what it means to re-write history has been overlooked. By examining the way Butler uses authorship to question authorial authority, one can see the way Butler uses her protagonist to revise history and reclaim historical figures. This process of reclamation and revision enables Butler to examine the historical gaps that have been created and the way enslaved blacks have been caricatured and further dehumanized. Through her protagonist, Butler is able to endow these historical figures with complex identities and emotions and challenges what it means to be a viable authorial voice.
dc.publisherMississippi State University
dc.subject.otherSarah
dc.subject.otherFolk Figures
dc.subject.otherReclamation
dc.subject.otherKevin
dc.subject.otherSarah
dc.subject.otherDana
dc.subject.otherOctavia Butler
dc.subject.otherKindred
dc.subject.otherViable Authorial Voice
dc.subject.otherMammy
dc.titleWho Speaks for the Enslaved? Authorship and Reclamation in Octavia Butler's Kindred
dc.typeThesis
dc.publisher.departmentDepartment of English
dc.publisher.collegeCollege of Arts & Sciences
dc.subject.degreeMaster of Arts
dc.subject.majorEnglish
dc.contributor.committeeHanshaw, Shirley A.
dc.contributor.committeeAtkinson, Theodore B.


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