Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorShmulsky, Rubin
dc.contributor.authorD'Errico, Hannah Kate
dc.date2016
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-02T16:26:02Z
dc.date.available2020-06-02T16:26:02Z
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11668/17564
dc.description.abstractThis research was conducted to discover how the U.S. building construction and forest products sectors could benefit from the development of tall, cross-laminated (CLT) and mass timber buildings. Barriers that may restrict such development were also investigated. The primary benefits were discovered to be eco-performance and job creation. Code restrictions and material performance misconceptions were found to be the largest obstacles. Case studies of Treet, Tamedia, and the WIDC were conducted to demonstrate the benefits of tall wood buildings and the various paths around potential barriers. Opportunities for tall wood buildings in the U.S. are also discussed. This research discovered that a tall wood movement is gathering momentum in the U.S. To fully realize this potential, accurate information regarding the use of wood and the performance capacities of mass timber systems needs to be disseminated. Co-operation between academia and industry will also be necessary.
dc.publisherMississippi State University
dc.subject.lcshCLT
dc.subject.lcshglu-lam
dc.subject.lcshcross laminated timber
dc.subject.lcshtall buildings
dc.subject.lcshsustainable
dc.subject.lcshgreen
dc.subject.lcshtechnology
dc.titleTall, Cross-Laminated and Massive Timber Buildings: A United States Perspective
dc.typeThesis
dc.publisher.departmentDepartment of Sustainable Bioproducts
dc.publisher.collegeCollege of Forest Resources
dc.date.authorbirth1982
dc.subject.degreeMaster of Science
dc.subject.majorSustainable Bioproducts
dc.contributor.committeeMontague, Iris
dc.contributor.committeeGallo, Warren C.


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record